Act Now to Get Your 2017 Inca Trail Trip – Permits Available Week Of December 19, 2016!

Machu-Picchu

Always wanted to trek the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu? Of course you have. We all have too (luckily we have already done the trek, but we still want to do it again). Well, you better act fast before permits sell out, likely before January 1, 2017 for premium dates.

But did you know that only about 200 trekkers (500 total permits, but most go to guides and porters) are allowed to start the trek on “The Inca Trail.” In reality there are lots and lots of Inca trails in South America, but this stretch to Machu Picchu claimed the name, and since it is the only way to arrive to Machu Picchu on foot on an Inca Trail, it is very popular. Like, really popular. So popular, in fact, that permits to trek the trail in April and May often sell out the first day permits are available. Other popular months, like June, July, and August sell out quickly as well, with most other dates selling out 3-6 months in advance.

In past years permits weren’t issued for the upcoming season until January or February. This year Inca Trail permits will be available in December for the first time since the permitting system was started, with March dates available to be claimed on December 19, 2016. What does that mean for you? Well, if you want to trek the Inca Trail this year (why wait, it will only get harder to get permits in the future), you should act fast so that you can grab a permit on the date you want before they sell out. Hopefully because nobody was expecting the permits to be available until January they won’t sell out for any dates on day 1. They still will sell out quickly.

MachuPicchu-windows-2000

As of now, it looks like permits will be available on the following schedule:

Monday, December 19, 2016, reservations for March will be accepted
Tuesday, December 21, 2016, for April
Wednesday, December 22, 2016, for May
Thursday, December 23, 2016, for June
Friday, December 24, 2016, it then opens for July onwards.

However, this schedule is tentative and it would surprise no one if this is delayed. Either way, book now so you can get the dates that fit your travel plans.

Our favorite way to trek the Inca Trail is on a 5-day schedule which allows you to avoid most of the crowds who travel and camp together on the 4-day schedule, and it allows more time at ruins along the way and at Machu Picchu.

Here are a couple of our favorite Inca Trail Treks:

Trek the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu plus Cusco and Sacred Valley Ruins

Inca Trail to Machu Picchu with Sacred Valley Adventures

 

How To Pack for Traveling in Peru

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SUGGESTED PACKING LIST

  • Nicer clothes for night life in Cusco
  • Shorts (quick dry)
  • Pants (quick dry)
  • T-shirts (quick dry)
  • A warm fleece, down jacket, or wool sweater (available in Cusco)
  • Underwear and socks (non-cotton)
  • Warm hat, gloves, & scarf
  • Water proof jacket & pants and/or rain poncho
  • Comfortable clothes for after the day’s activities
  • Good, well worn-in hiking boots
  • Sandals or other comfortable shoes
  • Trekking poles & protective tip covers (optional for travelers no trekking, recommended for those who are)
  • If you’re doing water activities, such as rafting for stand-up paddle boarding, you should bring clothes you can get wet and sandals with a heel strap for the water.
  • If you are biking, bring clothes you are comfortable biking in. Padded shorts are nice, but not necessary.
  • Refillable water bottles (2 liter capacity)
  • A water filter such as a hand pump or UV light — filtered water is provided by your trip operators during the day, but while you’re at your hotel, the airport, or having free time on your own, we highly recommend that you filter and drink tap water rather than buying bottled water. This will cut down on plastic waste, as Peru does not have the capacity to recycle plastic.
  • Sunglasses
  • Eyeglasses or contacts (if necessary)
  • Swim suit
  • Sun hat
  • Head lamp and spare batteries or power cord
  • Outlet adapter (Peru uses 220 volts / 60 Hz / American style two-pin plugs)
  • Book, notepaper & pen
  • Suntan lotion with 15 SPF or higher
  • After sun care
  • Lip balm
  • Insect repellent
  • Camera and spare battery or power cord
  • Personal toiletries
  • Money belt
  • Passport
  • Day pack (large enough to hold water, camera, warm layers, rain jacket, and snacks) and a rain cover for the pack
  • Personal first aid kit to include: painkillers, plasters (band-aids), moleskin, antiseptic cream, after bite, anti-diarrhea tablets, throat lozenges, re-hydration salts & personal medication. (Amazonas Explorer carries an extensive first aid kit & Oxygen on all trips, but these are generally for emergencies only)

 

HOW TO PACK 

Pro Tip: We recommend carrying on all of your most essential items on your flights to Cusco. This way, if your checked luggage is lost in transit, you will still be able to do the trek. For example, wear or carry on your hiking boots. Good, comfortable, and broken-in hiking boots are irreplaceable. Also carry on any prescription medications, sunglasses, and anything else that is irreplaceable for you. Everything else you might need (warm layers, toiletries, etc. can be found in Cusco).

Luggage on the Machu Picchu train is restricted to 5kg(10lbs) / 20ltrs(1300 cubic inches) carry-ons only.

Any excess gear may be stored in Cusco at your hotel while you are exploring the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu.

Most good quality sporting equipment is unavailable in Peru so if you wish to donate any outdoor clothes, sleeping bags, etc they will be gratefully received by any of our staff.

Should You Hike Huayna Picchu Mountain Or Machu Picchu Mountain?

Machu Picchu

Before you confirm your trip to Machu Picchu, consider whether or not you want to do one of the two permitted hikes that start in the Machu Picchu complex. These optional, challenging hikes are rewarding for fit travelers, but are definitely not suitable for everyone. If you’re going to Machu Picchu and want to challenge yourself, these hikes will be right up your alley.

One of the hikes is Huayna Picchu Mountain, which is the small sugar loaf mountain you see in the immediate background of most photos of Machu Picchu (like the one above). The other hike is called Machu Picchu Mountain (not to be confused Machu Picchu Ruins), which is a higher mountain located on the opposite side of the ruins from Huayna Picchu. Below is a chart of the differences between the two hikes.

The view from Machu Picchu Mountain, looking down on the ruins and Huayna Picchu.

The view from Machu Picchu Mountain, looking down on the ruins and Huayna Picchu.

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Best Sites in Quito for Arts and Culture

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There’s more to see and do in Quito than just visit the Equatorial line and ride a cable car up a steep hill.  Quito has a thriving arts scene and vibrant city life that many tourists miss unfortunately.  Our top recommendations will get you off the beaten path, where you can soak up the local culture and vibes of this fascinating city.

 

1.  Museo Casa del Alabado
This is a newer museum, located in Old Quito, with a very large and impressive collection of pre-Columbian art.  The building itself is also quite striking and worth the visit alone.  More info can be found HERE>>

- From Casa de Alabado

– From Casa de Alabado

2.  Calle de la Ronda
This picturesque street in Old Town can be a bit sleepy during the day.  In the evening though, tourists and locals flood the street and it becomes the bohemian place to wine, dine, and visit smaller, authentic art galleries.
- From City Art Hotel Silberstein

– From City Art Hotel Silberstein

3.  Capilla del Hombre and Guayasamin’s Museum
Located in a beautiful suburb overlooking downtown Quito, this striking art museum showcases the art of Ecuador’s most renowned painters, Oswaldo Guayasamin.  Right next door is the painter’s museum that commemorates humanitarian efforts in Latin America and the exploitative history of the area; we also recommend the guided tours which are outstanding. More info can be found HERE >>
- From Lonely Planet

– From Lonely Planet

4.  Handicrafts

The artisan market located near to Hilton Colon is a perfect place to pick-up inexpensive handmade crafts and weavings.  Higher quality (and pricier) goods can be found at individual handicraft shops like Galeria Ecuador, Tianguez, and Olga Fish.

5.  Plaza San Francisco

If you feel like just kicking back and observing city life, the sunny and historic Plaza San Francisco is an ideal spot for people watching.  The restaurants and handicraft shops are also a bit off-the-beaten path and highly recommended.
- From SFGate

– From SFGate

How To Pack for Trekking the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

Inca Trail Trek

This information is specifically for trekking the Inca Trail with the trip operators Amazonas Explorer. Other trip operators may have information that varies slightly.

The descent from Dead Woman's Pass on the Inca Trail

The descent from Dead Woman’s Pass on the Inca Trail

SUGGESTED PACKING LIST

  • Nicer clothes for night life in Cusco
  • Shorts (quick dry)
  • Pants (quick dry)
  • T-shirts (quick dry)
  • A warm fleece, down jacket, or wool sweater (available in Cusco)
  • Thermal underwear
  • Underwear and socks
  • Warm hat, gloves, & scarf
  • Water proof jacket & pants and/or rain poncho
  • After trekking trousers & t-shirt
  • Good, well worn-in hiking boots
  • Trekking poles & protective tip covers
  • After trek shoes (sandals)
  • Sleeping bag, -5C / 20F (available to rent)
  • Towel
  • Water bottles (2 liter capacity)
  • Sunglasses
  • Eyeglasses or contacts (if necessary)
  • Swim suit (optional)
  • Sun hat
  • Head lamp & spare batteries
  • Book, notepaper & pen (optional)
  • Suntan lotion with 15 SPF or higher
  • After sun care
  • Lip balm
  • Insect repellent
  • Camera & spare battery (charging is not availability during the trek)
  • Personal toiletries (only soap is provided)
  • Money belt
  • Passport
  • Day pack & rain cover
  • Personal first aid kit to include: painkillers, plasters (band-aids), moleskin, antiseptic cream, after bite, anti-diarrhea tablets, throat lozenges, re-hydration salts & personal medication. (Amazonas Explorer carries an extensive first aid kit & Oxygen on all trips, but these are generally for emergencies only)

 

HOW TO PACK 

For your trek, you will need a day backpack, large enough to hold water bottles, rain jacket & pants, a warm layer, sun screen, insect repellent, camera, and snacks. The day backpack makes a good carry-on for your flights.

For your main luggage, you can use whatever type of suitcase, duffle bag, or backpack you prefer. The main bulk of your luggage and your main suitcase will be left at your hotel in Cusco.

At your pre-trek briefing, your guide will provide you with a small duffle bag. In this, you will want to put all your clothing and gear that you will need for the trek. Please remember that this is limited to 17.6lbs / 8kg per person. Your porters will be carrying this duffle, and you will not have access to it during the day. You will need to take everything you need during the day in your day pack.

Pro Tip: We recommend carrying on all of your most essential items on your flights to Cusco. This way, if your checked luggage is lost in transit, you will still be able to do the trek. For example, wear or carry on your hiking boots. Good, comfortable, and broken-in hiking boots are irreplaceable. Also carry on any prescription medications, sunglasses, and anything else that is irreplaceable for you. Everything else required for your trek (sleeping bags, trekking poles, rain jackets & pants, etc. can be found in Cusco).

 

NOTES

  • The porters carry all you heavy camping gear but this is inaccessible during the day so please bring a small day-pack to carry your personal day gear in (i.e. water bottle, camera, sun block, insect repellent, light fleece and rain jacket).
  • Due to Inca Trail rules limiting the numbers of porters and the weight they carry, we have to limit your heavy gear to 8kg (17.6 lbs). This is usually more than adequate. Kit bags are supplied for these porter carried items.
  • Any excess gear may be stored in Cusco at your hotel while you are on the Inca Trail.
  • New rules at Machu Picchu limit the number of visitors to Huayna Picchu.  Please let us know when booking your trip if you wish to climb this peak so we can include your permits.
  • Inca Trail regulations stipulate ski poles are only allowed with plastic protecting covers. This is to prevent trail damage. ‘Native’ tree walking sticks are also banned on the trail. This is to prevent de-forestation.
  • We recommend trekkers take around 600 soles in local currency for any emergencies and expenses in Machu Picchu.
  • We implement a ‘porter protection policy’ that ensures all porters are well treated, paid, insured, fed and looked after.
  • Most good quality sporting equipment is unavailable in Peru so if you wish to donate any outdoor clothes, sleeping bags, etc they will be gratefully received by any of our staff.

Inter-Island Flights in the Galapagos

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Here’s the nitty gritty on flights within the Galapagos.

Emetebe is the airline of the Galapagos and your only choice for flying between islands. Their fleet of Britten Norman Islanders have room for 8 in the main cabin. Because of their low carrying capacity, it is a good idea to pre-arrange your flights prior to your trip. All of our Galapagos trips include the necessary inter-island transportation.

Baggage Restrictions: Guests are allowed 1 checked luggage of no more than 20 lbs + 1 small carry on.

Pricing: $175.00 per way

Flight Schedule:

You can fly from Baltra Island (servicing Santa Cruz Island), Isabela Island, and San Cristobal.

  • Baltra – San Cristobal departs at 9:30 am
  • Baltra – Isabela departs at 12:30 pm
  • San Cristobal to Baltra departs at 10:30 am
  • San Cristobal to Isabela departs at 7:30 am *
  • Isabela to Baltra departs at 8:30 am
  • Isabela to San Cristobal departs at 1:30 pm *

*Note: There are no direct speedboats between these two islands. You’ll lose most of the day to travel if you route by speedboat. It is best to fly between San Cristobal and Isabela islands.

Here’s a short clip on what it’s like to fly on these small puddle jumpers, 

 

Want more info on getting around in the Galapagos, check out our Galapagos Travel Planning Guide.

 

 

 

 

Which Peru Trek is Right For You?

Inca Trail

Peru is trekking heaven, and there are so many options out there! The five most popular areas to trek around Cusco and Machu Picchu are the Inca Trail, Salkantay, Lares Valley, Choquequirao, and Ausangate. Each of these areas provide a different experience. Which trek is right for you? Continue reading

Going to the Galapagos, Should I Fly Into Quito or Guayaquil?

TAME flight at Baltra, Galapagos

Map of EcuadorTo get to the Galapagos Islands you must first travel to Ecuador, as flights to the Galapagos originate either from Quito or Guayaquil, Ecuador. When looking into which city to fly into consider how much time you have.

GUAYAQUIL (coastal)

Malecon, GuayaquilIf you are just laying over briefly the night before/after your Galapagos trip, then Guayaquil makes good sense. The airport is much closer to downtown (about 20- 30 min vs. 1.5– 2 hrs of Quito’s) with a slew of good hotels to choose from. Many that offer free airport shuttles. It’s also a shorter, direct flight from Guayaquil to the Galapagos. However, Guayaquil is a commercial, port city and not the most interesting city to explore as a tourist. This isn’t to say it isn’t worth spending a half day to wander around, grab some ceviche and check out the sights and sounds. Continue reading

You CAN still hike the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu this summer 2016!

Machu Picchu Windows to the World

Thinking of traveling to Peru this summer? Always wanted to hike the world famous Inca Trail so you arrive at Machu Picchu on foot? Too late! Permits to trek the regular Inca Trail are already sold out from April until the latter part of August. And once permits are gone there is no chance to hike the Inca Trail.

Or is there? The Government of Peru has just decided to create an additional 250 permits per day for the 1-Day Inca Trail, also known as the Royal Inca Trail, that joins the regular trek for the final stretch of trail to Machu Picchu. These permits are in addition to the 500 permits for the full Inca Trail and mean that, yes, you can still hike the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu this summer!

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Previously, 500 permits were issued per day for any stretch of the Inca Trail. And, while this sounds like a lot, the 500 permits are for both tourists and trekking staff, meaning at best there are 200 – 250 trekkers allowed to start the trek each day. Most of these permits were booked by trekking groups on the full Inca Trail, and the permits always sell out months in advance. If you didn’t start planning your Inca Trail trip in January, odds are you wouldn’t be able to get a permit for prime summer dates.

The new regulations separate permits for the full Inca Trail (still 500 permits per day) and the 1-Day Inca Trail. There are now 250 additional permits just for the 1-day Inca Trail, meaning there should be plenty of permits available for people wanting to do this trek, even in mid summer. Yes, you can still trek the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu this year. Continue reading

Short Galapagos Cruises to the Western Islands of Isabela and Fernandina

on the Ocean Spray Galapagos Cruise

So you’ve done a ton of research, and you know that you want to go to the far western part of at the Galapagos Islands: Isabela and Fernandina Islands. But you’ve run into a problem! Most cruises that go to Isabela and Fernandina Islands are 8 day cruises, and you just don’t have the time or budget to go that long.

Don’t worry! There are quite a few shorter 5 and 6 day cruises out there that visit Isabela and Fernandina Islands:
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Extra Costs for a Galapagos Trip

on the Ocean Spray Galapagos Cruise

You’ve paid for Galapagos trip and booked your hotel in mainland Ecuador, but there are a few more costs you’ll need to plan on paying once in Ecuador for your Galapagos trip.  Below you will find a list of typical extra costs for any Galapagos trip.  Keep in mind that your trip may differ a bit from this (in regards to which meals have been included or which fees have been pre-paid), so consult your itinerary and trip details more information. Continue reading

What is the Difference Between the Classes of Boats in the Galapagos Islands?

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There are four classes of boats in the Galapagos Islands:

  • Luxury Class
  • First Class
  • Tourist Superior Class
  • Tourist or Economy Class

These classes vary by price, amenities on board, level of comfort, size of the cabins, and sometimes even by the quality of naturalist guide and itinerary. Continue reading

Best Videos About Galapagos Wildlife

Sea_lions

Daydreaming about your trip to the Galapagos? Here are some of our favorite videos about the amazing wildlife of the Galapagos.

Waved Albatross are large, beautiful birds who mate for life and have endearing interactions with each other. Nearly every waved albatross in the world nests on Española Island in the Galapagos. They are on this island from mid-April to late December.

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Are You an Adventure Snob? The Huaorani Can Cure You!

Huaorani Ecolodge

Do you set high expectations for your next travel experience? You should, of course, but if you’re anything like me you’re looking to one-up with an adventure that does more than live up to past experiences. You crave a new experience, one that takes you on a “life changing” or “mind-blowing” adventure. Ideally, both.

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How to Pack For the Galápagos Islands

Galapagos-iguana

If you’re like me, it’s the night before you fly to Ecuador, and you’re wasting precious sleeping hours agonizing over what to pack for your trip to the Galápagos Islands and what to leave at home.

If you’re like my co-worker Katie, you are super organized and have everything laid out and ready to go well before you leave. Since she’s the pro here, I’ll let her take you through the details:

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For the Aggressive Latin American Dog, Speak Loudly and Carry a Big Rock

Peruvian-dog

While I love riding my bicycle in foreign lands for the freedom to soak in the countryside and get to know the locals, somewhere between Cusco and La Paz I changed from free spirit to warrior. Had to. A dog bit my leg. The worst part, I could see it was coming. After months of outracing untold numbers of dogs from Quito to here, the odds were against me. I was going to lose this race, eventually. And here I had.

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Piranhas for Breakfast in the Bolivian Amazon?

Piranha teeth, Amazon

As I watched the little girl swimming the black water, a man fishing from the dock spoke to her in soft tones. His line went tight, and with one pull of his hand a fluttering fish hit the dock. Whack! The man’s bucket was filling fast, each fish put still by a club to the head. I walked over to look at the catch. What the … ! Piranhas, all piranhas!

I looked from the bucket to the girl treading water, who was smiling at me as though I was the first of my kind she’d ever seen. Maybe I was. I looked back into the bucket. The piranha at the top of the heap bent skyward its head and tail. A gash of its teeth, a gasp … the death knell. This deep in the Bolivian jungle, do I point out the obvious danger to the girl?

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Detour’s New Truck Is A Bike

Detour's New Truck is a Yuba Cargo Bike

Here at Detour we are always looking for ways to get outside, get some exercise, and cut our carbon footprint, so you can only imagine how stoked we were to discover Yuba Bikes line of cargo bikes. Yuba bikes are fantastic people and stuff movers, and easily take the place of a car or small truck for running errands around town.

We immediately grabbed a Mundo to be our office truck, for hauling recycling or picking up supplies; we also have it set up to haul kids to school (with monkey bars that allow kids to sit safely on the back with no chance of falling off) so I can ride two kids to school on my way to work.

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Review of the Galapagos Islands Multisport Adventure: Family with 3 Teens

Galapagos Boobie

Wondering if the Galapagos Islands Multisport Adventure trip is right for your family?  Our most recent review of the trip is a great description of the experience and evaluation of the tour.  This family of five traveled with their three teenage kids (ages 12, 14, and 16) in April 2014.  They booked a privately guided tour so they could have as much flexibility with the itinerary as possible and added on the optional Los Tunneles tour while on Isabela.  You can read their review below and learn more about the Galapagos Island Multisport Adventure tour they did by clicking here.
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Wow! Wow! Wow! Detour Does It Again!

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(We just received the nicest email from a happy client – Stephanie Mayer who traveled with  her son Cooper in Costa Rica. Stephanie previously traveled with her other son in Peru. We love hearing about your great travel experiences – that is why we do this!)

Wow! Wow! Wow!

Once again there really are no words to adequately express my appreciation for ALL your efforts in putting together the most perfect Costa Rican adventure.

It was a true HOME RUN, like Peru!!  A perfect trio of experiences blended into one trip;  Cooper and I felt like we had three mini vacations and one big adventure – all equally great, all incredibly different and all representative of the diversity and splendor of Costa Rica.

You delivered high adventure, great guides, wonderful hotels, great food, spectacular beauty and a taste of the culture and people of Costa Rica.
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How to Book Flights for a Galapagos Trip

Giant Tortoise, Santa Cruz Highlands (Galapagos)
Blue-Footed Boobie spotted on an Odyssey Galapagos Cruise

Blue-Footed Boobie spotted on an Odyssey Galapagos Cruise

Planning your international and domestic flights for a Galapagos trip can seem complicated initially, but they’re actually quite simple to arrange.  Detour’s tips and suggestions below will help you plan exactly the flights you need without the headache.
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New Years in Argentina

Buenos Aires musician

Buenos Aires musician in San Telmo

Argentina loves a good party and it seems this is never more true than on New Years Eve.  My own experience celebrating New Years in Argentina will remain one of my most memorable ever, but I wanted to know how typical Argentinians celebrate as well.  The experts over at Wanderlust Expediciones let me know that my night of revelry so many years ago is pretty typical of the jubilant celebrations had all over the country.
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Celebrating New Year’s in Ecuador

Cúpulas de iglesias de centro histórico QUito Ecuador
Kids celebrating in Ecuador

Kids celebrating in Ecuador

Ecuadorians really know how to party, and New Year’s Eve is no exception.  If you’re in Ecuador for this super fun holiday, you’re going to experience many of the same traditions (like kissing at midnight), and a lot of very traditions you’ve probably never seen before.  We’re here to fill you in on everything you need to know so you can get in on the fun if you’re lucky enough to to ring in the New Year’s in Ecuador.

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Christmas in Cusco and Machu Picchu

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Cusco, Peru

Christmas celebrations everywhere have at least one common thread: a time for family and friends to gather together.   But, the traditions we each have for celebrating can vary greatly (even from town to town).   While shops in our cozy town of Bozeman are closing early, our friends down in Cusco are taking to the Plaza de Armas (the main square) to visit the Santuarnicuy “saints for sale” market.   Hundreds of artisans and rural villagers flock to downtown Cusco to sell their handmade goods.
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What to do in Ecuador on Christmas

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Otovalo Woman in Traditional Dress

Otovalo Woman in Traditional Dress

Traveling during the holidays is an amazing way to learn about the culture and traditions of a country, and maybe pick up a few new traditions of your own.  It also means that you have to arrange your trip a bit differently to accommodate the holiday schedule in that country or make special plans to observe local traditions.  Our Ecuador Holiday Travel Guide will let you know what to look forward to and how to plan your vacation over Christmas.

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How to Pay Argentina’s Reciprocity Fee

Argentinean cowboy style

Argentinean cowboy style

You’re all set to fly to Argentina where you’ll trek Fitzroy, sip wine, and learn to tango . . . but what is up with that reciprocity fee? This very confusing fee is a somewhat new requirement for US, Canadian, and Australian citizen to enter the country. But no worries, we’ve got you covered with our quick guide to Argentina’s reciprocity fee and how to to pay it.

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How Your Vacation Can Help Preserve the Ecuadorian Amazon

Sally, Roberto (our naturalist guide), and Eweme (our local Huaorani guide)

DSC01310_2As a destination, Ecuador’s rainforest is nowhere near as popular as the Galapagos.  That famous archipelago shines brightly on every Westerners bucket list, leaving Ecuador’s many other wonders into the background as an afterthought.  But in terms of wildlife diversity and unique plantlife, the Ecuadorian rainforest definitely rivals the Galapagos as a must-see destination.  Plus every visitor to the rainforest actually helps preserve this culturally and environmentally important region.

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6 Insider Tips on Visiting Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu in the morning before the crowds arrive

Machu Picchu in the morning before the crowds arrive

Anyone can plan a trip to Machu Picchu, but it takes a real travel ninja to see the site in the wee hours of dawn, avoid the crowds, and hike to the top of Huayna Picchu.  Commit these 6 insider tips to memory and you’ll get the Machu Picchu experience you’ve been dreaming of.

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3 Ways to See Tons of Wildlife on a Rainforest Trip

Golden-Mantled Tamarin spotted at the Napo Wildlife Center in Ecuador

Golden-Mantled Tamarin spotted at the Napo Wildlife Center in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park.

You want to visit the rainforest to see monkeys, caimans, toucans, sloths, and capybaras up close, not just sit in a tree and itch mosquito bites.  So how do you maximize your chances of seeing pink river dolphins splashing in the river and macaws swooping in by the hundreds?  It’s actually not too hard as long as you keep a few guidelines in mind before booking your trip. Continue reading